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HR News Round-Up November 2017

Posted On: 16/11/2017

The gig economy, diversity targets and stress at work…all very prevalent issues in the news cycle at the moment but we finish with an interesting study out this week about your name and how it relates to how much you get paid...and it’s not good news for us girls.

Government urges businesses to employ more Women in senior roles

According to the Hampton-Alexander review, an independent diversity study backed by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy Businesses, says that businesses should hand 40% of senior jobs to women[1].

The review says this is in order to hit Government-backed diversity targets to have women holding one third of executive and board-level jobs by 2020.

Stressed at work?

If you work in welfare or nursing, recent research reveals that you are most likely to suffer from stress at work[2].

The report, by the Health and Safety Executive, identified professional occupations, including welfare, nursing, teaching and some legal professions, as the most likely to cause work-related stress, depression or anxiety.

Workload pressures, such as tight deadlines and too much responsibility, and a lack of managerial support were cited as the most likely causes.

Gig economy model takes a battering in court

Uber’s appeal against an employment tribunal, which ruled that their taxi drivers should be considered as workers and, as such, should be entitled to the minimum wage, as well as holiday and sick pay, has failed and may now head to the UK Supreme Court[3].

The GMB union has urged Uber to accept the decision of the courts and to allow its workers the employment rights they are entitled to, thereby keeping the public, drivers and passengers safe.

The decision is also expected to have wide-ranging implications for the gig economy in Britain.

What’s in a name?

If your name is Liz, Ed, Jo or Giles, you could be one of the world’s top earners according to a recent survey[4].

But, sadly, the gender pay gap rears its ugly head in the 2017 survey as the highest earning female name, Liz, with an average salary of £38,792, typically earns £22,570 less than the highest earning male name, Ed, which attracts an average salary of £61,362.

Even worse, there are 316 men’s names scoring higher in the survey than our Liz. But our thoughts go to Paige (£20,190), Chelsea (£21,044) and Bethany (£21,488) who are at the very bottom of the list, below the lowest earning male names, Reece (£22,952), Connor (£24,471) and Patryk (£25,207).

[1] The Telegraph, 9th November 2017

[2] The Metro, 8th November 2017

[3] The Huffington Post, 10th November 2017

[4] Personnel Today, 8th November 2017

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